Mission Statement
The Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council, Inc. will support member tribes in expanding sovereignty and self-determination.

Vision Statement
The Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council, Inc. (GLITC) will support member tribes in expanding self-determination efforts by providing services and assistance. GLITC will use a broad range of knowledge and experience to advocate for the improvement and unity of tribal governments, communities, and individuals. Throughout these activities, GLITC will maintain deep respect for tribal sovereignty and reservation community values.

GLITC History and Background

Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council, Inc. (GLITC) had its beginnings in the early 1960’s as the consequences of the federal experiment of Termination began to play out with the Menominee tribe. Beginning as an association of the leaders of the other ten tribes located in Wisconsin, GLITC was incorporated in 1965 with the purpose of providing a mechanism through which the tribes could work through the challenges of governance and services to their constituents. Through intertribal unity, the tribes could better develop and implement programs, seek outside assistance, and gain leverage in dealing with federal, state, and local government.

GLITC’s strength lies in the resolve of the tribes to be independent and self-governing, yet to come together in a unified forum to discuss and resolve those issues that require intertribal unity and attention. As independent governments, the tribes operated widely varied government service systems, and address their communities’ needs in numerous ways. GLITC supplements the member tribes’ own efforts through development and operation of health and human service programs, education programs, and economic development programs in the reservation communities it serves. Intergovernmental relations and policy decisions find an intertribal discussion forum through GLITC. However, through long-standing custom, public comment and policy implementation is reserved for the member tribes through their own elected representatives.
Today, the following federally recognized tribes are the members of GLITC.

•Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians
•Forest County Potawatomi Community
•Ho-Chunk Nation
•Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin
•Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
•Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians (in upper Michigan)
•Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin
•Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin
•Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
•St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin
•Sokaogon Chippewa Community
•Stockbridge-Munsee Community

The organizational goals and objectives are established with the approval of the Board of Directors, which is comprised of the tribal chairperson or president of each member tribe. The twelve member tribes represent six nations on twelve reservations, a land base of about 1 million acres spanning 45 counties. In many counties, the tribe’s agencies and enterprises amount to the largest employer in the county, and the total annual economic impact of tribal purchases and payroll amounts to more than a billion dollars.
The GLITC Board of Directors meets bi-monthly on a rotating basis at one of the member tribe’s facilities. The Board of Directors meets the second Thursday of every other month, beginning in January with the Annual Meeting. At that meeting, the corporate officers - president, vice president, and secretary/treasurer - are elected. The second meeting of the year is held in Madison, in conjunction with the annual State of the Tribes Address to a joint session of the Wisconsin Legislature, which provides a forum for open discussion with key State Legislators and Cabinet members.

The central office is located in Lac du Flambeau, while outreach services, including technical assistance, are performed at various tribal locations. GLITC employs more than 80 staff at its central office and several of the tribal headquarters. Satellite staff members also serve the urban Native American population in Milwaukee through numerous human service and education programs.

Service Area
The Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council provides services to Native Americans in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota






©2014 Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council INC.
2932 Highway 47 N.
P.O. Box 9
Lac du Flambeau, WI 54538
Phone: 715-588-3324
Fax: 715-588-7900

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